Ancestors of Russell Merz Richardson

Notes


1217. Abigail Knapp

44. Abigail Knapp (Moses, Nicholas)303,304 was born Abt. 1671 in Stamford, CT, and died 08 February 1706/07 in Stamford, CT. She married John Crissey, Sr305,306,307 01 December 1692 in Stamford, CT308, son of William Crissey and Sarah.
Children of Abigail Knapp and John Crissey are:
211 i. Sarah Crissey309, born 25 April 1693 in Stamford, CT. She married John Green 07 November 1717 in Stamford, CT.
212 ii. Abigail Crissey310, born 08 March 1694/95 in Stamford, CT; died Abt. 1695 in Stamford, CT[died young].
213 iii. John Crissey, Jr310, born 02 February 1695/96 in Stamford, CT; died 1787 in Woodbury, Litchfield Co, CT. He married (1) Mary Hurd 22 June 1720 in Woodbury, Litchfield Co, CT. He married (2) Elizabeth Hurd 16 April 1747 in Woodbury, Litchfield Co, CT.
+ 214 iv. Deborah Crissey, born 14 February 1697/98 in Stamford, CT; died 31 May 1748 in Stamford, CT.
+ 215 v. Nathaniel Crissey, born 16 September 1700 in Stamford, CT; died 1768 in Stamford, CT.
+ 216 vi. Moses Crissey, Sr, born 14 February 1701/02 in Stamford, CT.
217 vii. Mary Crissey311, born 15 February 1704/05 in Stamford, CT; died 14 August 1743 in Stamford, CT. She married Andrew Bishop312,313 07 March 1733/34 in Stamford, CT.


1220. Rev John Davenport

or died 1731
Graduated from Harvard 1687


1222. Joseph Bishop

Bishop, Joseph, Sr., late of Stamford, will dated June 8, 1727, probated Nov. 21, 1733, mentions his wife Elizabeth, and children Joseph, Charles, Andrew, Alexander, Hannah, Sarah Davenport, Rebecca, Elizabeth, Mary, and Martha. Executors his wife and his son Joseph. Witnesses John Hait, David Sherman, Jr., and Samuel Cook, page 61. Inventory taken Dec. 11, 1733, and filed Mar. 6, 1734, page 64.

2. JOSEPH BISHOP (JOHN) was born October 16, 1664 in Stamford, CT, and died September 14, 1733. He married ELIZABETH KNOWLES November 3, 1691. She died April 29, 1754.
Children of JOSEPH BISHOP and ELIZABETH KNOWLES are: 6.i.JOSEPH BISHOP, b. October 16, 1692. ii.ALEXANDER BISHOP, b. April 15, 1694; d. October 21, 1706. iii.CHARLES BISHOP, b. May 5, 1695. 7.iv.ANDREW BISHOP, b. October 3, 1696. v.HANNAH BISHOP, b. July 8, 1698. vi.NATHAN BISHOP, b. October 29, 1699. vii.ELIZABETH BISHOP, b. June 3, 1700; d. January 12, 1705/06. viii.SARAH BISHOP, b. December 27, 1701. ix.REBECCA BISHOP, b. July 17, 1703. x.ELIZABETH BISHOP, b. April 1, 1705. xi.HELENA BISHOP, b. April 1, 1705; d. June 6, 1721. xii.MARY BISHOP, b. July 21, 1708; d. August 19, 1766. xiii.MARTHA BISHOP, b. October 31, 1709. xiv.ALEXANDER BISHOP, b. January 5, 1710/11


1224. John Grosvenor

John Grosvenor came from Roxbury in 1686 with 5 others and settled on 15,100 acres of land which they purchased just south of Roxbury, Mass and was called Mashamoquat, afterwards known as Pomfret. He had 2 sons, John and Leicester. In 1710 a military company was organized when about x0 males over 16 years of age were reported in Pomfret settlement. Leicester II was Sergeant in 1713, Lieutenant in 172x and Captain in 1733.

Descendants of John Grosvenor or Gravenor
The Emigrant

Generation No. 15 (Continued)

*40. John Grosvenor or15 Gravenor (William14, William13, Richard12, William11 Grosvenor, Esq.,
Rowland10Gravenor, William9, John8 Grasvenor, John7 Gravenor, Henry6, Thomas5 Grasvenor, Richard4, Richard3De Gravenor, William2, Adam1) was born January 02, 1640/41 in The Friars, St. Leonard Parish, Bridgenorth, Salop,
England, and died September 27, 1691 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts, in his 49th year. He was baptized on
January 2, 1640/41 at St. Leonard's Church, Bridgenorth, England. His burial site is Eustis Street Graveyard,
Roxbury, Massachusetts.


John's name was spelled Gravenor when he entered the United States. He later changed the name to
Grosvenor. See Coat-of-Arms documents beginning on page 1.

He married Esther Clark (Clarke)About 1672 in Watertown, Middlesex, Mass., daughter of Hugh and
Elizabeth Clarke.

Their home in Roxbury with four acres of orchard and pasture stood in the N.E. corner of the present
Tremont and Parker Streets. He died before settlement at Pomfret began; but his widow and children settled in
Pomfret.

His wife, Esther, was probably at Watertown, Mass., about 1651 and died at Pomfret, June 15, 1738.

From the notes of Horace Chipman Grosvenor and Oliver Gay Grosvenor, around 1930s or 1940s, the
Family Bible of Lemuel Grosvenor was in the possession of Clarissa Thompson of Pomfret, CT. The Bible states
John and Esther his wife came to Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1680, but records in that county show John was in
Roxbury as early as 1673.

Little is known of John Grosvenor himself. He was in Roxbury as early as 1672; but how long he had
been there, we are not told. By occupation, he was a tanner and land investor. He held the office of town constable.

On January 28, 1684, John Grosvenor's father-in-law, Hugh Clarke of Roxbury, confirmed to John by
deed a grant of land on which John Grosvenor's house, tanning yard and tan house stood. (Suffolk Deeds, lib. 13,
fo. 328.) (The original deed is in the possession of Benjamin H. Grosvenor of Pomfret, Conn.)

As a land investor, in May, 1686, with five other men, (Samuel Ruggles Sr., Samuel Ruggles Jr., John
White, Samuel Gore), John purchased from Capt. James Fitch of Norwich, CT, the Mashomoquet tract of land,
comprising 15,100 acres in the northeastern corner of Connecticut (which included the territory of the present
towns of Pomfret, Brooklyn, and Putnam and the parish of Abington, CT). The price was 30 pounds. The deed
stipulated that they should immediately take in six more partners and that two shares should be reserved for Capt.
Fitch himself, making a total of 14 shares. The disturbed conditions which attended the regime of Gov. Andros
delayed the enterprise so that no division of the tract into separate holdings was made until March, 1694.

World Book, page 434, 1978, states:

"Sir Edmund Andros (1637-1714) was an English soldier and administrator. He served as
governor of New York colony from 1674 to 1681. In 1686, he became governor of several
northern colonies, called the Dominion of New England. He went to Hartford, CT, to demand
the charter that gave the people of that colony the right to govern themselves. They refused to
surrender it. According to legend, they hid the charter in a tree, which came to be called the
Charter Oak. The northern colonists thought Andros was unjust. In 1689, after King James
II was overthrown, Boston citizens imprisoned Andros. He was sent to England for trial, but
was not tried. He returned in 1692 as Governor of Virginia."

John Grosvenor died in 1691, thus in 1694, his share was allotted to his widow (502 acres and comprised the
land where the village of Pomfret now stands and the hills which surround it, including Prospect Hill, which faces
the east, and the commanding eminences called Sharp's Hill and Spaulding's Hill on the west.).
Perhaps, the fact that three of their children were under 10 years of age at the time made it seem unwise to
expose them to the hardships of a life in the wilderness and Esther Clarke Grosvenor kept her children in Roxbury,
MA, until the fall of 1695. Mrs. Grosvenor sold her property in Roxbury and bought a farm at Muddy River, now
Brookline, Massachusetts. She sold this farm in April, 1701, and removed to their wilderness estate in Connecticut.

By the year 1713, a considerable settlement had grown up on the Grosvenor portion of Mashamoquet, and it
was deemed advisable to incorporate. The village received the name of Pomfret. In the task of subduing the
wilderness and in the subsequent life of the community of Pomfret, the Grosvenors were important and honorable
participants.

Esther Grosvenor was appointed administratrix of the estate of her deceased husband, and on 2/17/1691 or
1692 filed her bond for 700 pounds, indicating that John had left his widow with financial security.

On September 16, 1695 Esther sold two of the properties she had inherited from her father and husband: "Six
acres called Rock Pasture, the "Rightful Inheritance of Hugh Clarke late of said Roxbury deceased and by the said
Esther Grosvenor purchased of his son John," and 3« acres, the "Rightful Inheritance of aforesaid John Grosvenor
... together with Mansion house, barn, etc." On the same day she and her son William "and all other heirs of the
said John Grosvenor" purchased 65 acres at Muddy River, now Brookline, Mass., together with a dwelling house, f
the consideration being 312 pounds. On October 7, 1695 they purchased 30 acres at Muddy River, "together with
the house, fruit trees, wood," etc., the consideration being 150 pounds. On April 15, 1701 Esther Grosvenor,
William Grosvenor, Gentleman, and Susannah Grosvenor of Muddy River, and John Grosvenor of
"Mashamnggabuck" in New London Co. CT, sold "their Farm Tract" at Muddy River.(Suffolk Deeds, lib. 17, ff.
261, 262, lib. 31, fo. 198, and lib. 33, fo. 188)."

About this time, the widow Esther Grosvenor went with her family to Mashamoquet in Connecticut, where
she resided for the remaining years of her life. The road to Hartford and Windham, CT, passed through the
Grosvenor land which was on the western declivity of Prospect Hill, near the site afterwards occupied by Col.
Thomas Grosvenor's mansion house. Mrs. Grosvenor was a woman of great courage and energy, and was held in
high esteem by the early settlers of Pomfret. It is a family tradition that she was skilled in tending the sick. She
would be proud to know that so many of her descendants became medical doctors or nurses.

The so-called old Ralph Sabin homestead at Sabin Corner is still standing and was owned in 1950 by Capt.
Hugh Goodhue, a descendant of the Grosvenor family. Esther Grosvenor lived and died in that home. Esther's
sons aided in bringing the large acreage of land under cultivation, and identified themselves early with the growth
and interests of the town.

John's name was probably spelled Gravenor. The family in England flourished in the parish of Claverley
derived its name from the hamlet of Gravenor, appearing in the earliest records of "de Gravenor." See information
on the Coat of Arms on the following page 8.

John and Esther (Clarke) Grosvenor had nine children. A brief account of them will be given below.

1. William, born Jan. 8, 1672/3, baptized Dec. 14, 1673. Graduated at Harvard, 1693. Is said to have
settled first at Charlestown, Mass. From 1705 to 1708, he was minister at Brookfield, Mass. He later removed to
the South. His will, dated Nov. 5, 1702, probated July 26, 1721, is in the possession of the North Carolina
Historical Commission at Raleigh, NC. His wife Sarah is named as executrix of his will, and three daughters,
Susanna. Elizabeth and Esther, are mentioned.

2. John, baptized June 6, 1675. Seems to have preceded the rest of the family to Mashamoquet. In 1707, he
joined his elder brother at Brookfield, Mass., and bought land there. He married Jan. 27, 1708/9, Sarah Haywardof Concord, Mass. On July 22, 1710, while he and five other men were making hay in the meadows, they were
suddenly attacked by Indians and all were slain.

3. Leicester, born about 1677, died Sept. 8, 1759, in his 83rd year. Married Jan. 16, 1711/2, Mary
Hubbard. She died May 14,1724, aged 37. He married (2) Feb.12,1728, Rebecca Waldo. She died May 21,
1753, in her 61st year.

4. Moses, born about 1678, died Feb. 5, 1726, aged 48 years.

5. Susanna, born Feb. 9, 1680/1, baptized Feb. 13, 1680/1. Married Mar. 26, 1703, Joseph Shaw of
Stonington, Conn.

6. A child, born in 1683, died at birth. Various transcripts of the record give the month as the 4th or the 7th,
and the day as the 4th or the 21st. No doubt the figures are indistinct.

7. Ebenezer, born Oct. 9, 1684, died Sept. 20, 1730, in his 46th year. Married Ann of Woodstock, intention
recorded Dec. 26, 1707. She died July 30, 1743, in her 56th year.

8. Thomas, born June 30, 1687, died Feb. 6, 1729/30, in his 43rd year. Married May 22, 1718, Elizabeth
Pepper. She died Dec. 23, 1770 in her 77th year.

In the record of deaths at Roxbury, we find the name of Thomas Grosvenor, son of John and Esther, under
date of June 30, 1687, the day of his birth. This has commonly been accepted as evidence that the Thomas who
lived to maturity was a later child of the same name. Inasmuch, however, as the baptism of Thomas was recorded
July 10, 1687, it would seem that his decease ten days earlier, must have been less fatal than has been supposed.
The record of his death is undoubtedly an error.

9. Joseph, born Sept. 1, 1689, died June 20, 1738, in his 49th year.

There has been a controversy if the John's descendants' surname should be Grosvenor, Grasvenor, Gravenor
or Gravener, and if our true ancestors were entitled to a Coat-of-Arms. There is also a query if John was the son
of the 19th Grosvenor, the 1st Baronet and Night or of 20 the Second Baronet.

Emigrant John Gravenor name was spelled Gravener. His ancestral family in England flourished in the parish
of Claverley derived its name from the hamlet of Gravenor, appearing in the earliest records as De Gravenor." In
the article, "JOHN GROSVENOR OF ROXBURY, MASS., HIS FAMILY AND ANCESTRY" states, "In April,
1918, The New England Historical and Genealogical Register published an article entitled "The English Home and
Ancestry of John Grosvenor of Roxbury, Mass.," in which the writer, Mr. Daniel Kent, effectually dispelled some
of the myths in which romanticized tradition had previously enshrouded this subject. For enlightenment on these
issues, refer to the book, "John Grosvenor of Roxbury, Mass. - His Family and Ancestry" by Winthrop Haight
Hopkins, which has been scanned and reprinted herein beginning on page 1. Below is an excerpt of that booklet:

John registered in Roxbury as Gravenor. The birth records there also record the birth of William Gravenor,
son of John, Jan. 8, 1672. Records also contain spellings of the family name as Gravenor and Gravener. His
father-in-law, Hugh Clarke, deeded property to him twice. Spellings of John's name was listed 13 times as
Gravener, Gravenor and Gravenr.

It is true that in the records of Cheshire, England, where the Grosvenor family originated, the form Gravenor
occasionally appears as a variant to Grosvenor. John, himself, must have believed this to be so for he occasionally
referred to himself as Grosvenor. Gravenor was the popular spelling in the Claverley parish 222 times until 1727,
and after 1770 the name is almost invariably Grosvenor. It is believed that those in England thought the name was
a misspelling and changed to the more illustrious name of Grosvenor. John's brother Leicester baptized a son
Christopher as Grosvenor. From this time on, the name of our lineage was officially Grosvenor. John eventually
changed the spelling of his last name and adopted the coat-of-arms that was modified for our lineage by the heralds
in England.

John's brother Leicester also applied for permission to use the Grosvenor arms, alleging that he was
descended from the Grosvenours of Eton in Cheshire. He presented a pedigree, which is preserved in the files of the
College of Arms in London, for a copy of which we are indebted to Mr. Kent. The pedigree was certified by
Leicester 8/14/163? and the name is spelled Grosvenour wherever it occurs. A herald who reviewed the document
wrote, "Respite given to make proof of the Descent from the Grosvenours of Eton in Cheshire, and that being done
to allow the Arms with a fit difference, but nothing done therein." The reason why nothing was done therein is
obvious. Leicester's forebears had lived in Bridgnorth for five generations, and in the parishes of Bobbington and
Claverley for more than 200 years before that; yet, his pedigree goes back only to his grandfather.

John adopted the Coat of Arms as a descendant of John Gravenor of Tettenhall. That John Gravenoor had
five sons and our John was not a descendant. Obviously our John accepted the Coat of Arms. The Arms has a
crescent. A crescent on Arms is the mark of cadency used to designate that one of his ancestors was a second son
in the direct male line. John obviously accepted the Arms to be justifiably his family's Coat-of-Arms.

John's gravestone at Roxbury is still standing (1998). The inscription reads, "Here yeth buried ye body of
John Grosvenor who Decd Septem Ye 27 in Ye 49 Year of his age 1691, plus the Grosvenor Coat-of-Arms."

*Esther Clarke Grosvenor

According to "Folklore and Firesides of Pomfret, Hampton and Vicinity" by Susan Jewett Griggs, pp. 7, 8,
30-31, "In the division of plots Mrs. Esther Grosvenor chose some of the finest land on Pomfret Hill, Ct., and a
tract of land in the Ragged Hill section on Post Road.

Mrs. Grosvenor was endowed with great courage and energy, and although she had been gently reared in
England, like a true pioneer endured the hard life cheerfully. Skilled in the care of the sick, for many years she was
the only medical practitioner.

Once, when alone, her home was invaded by a company of Indians, who threatened to take a boiling pot of
meat from the fire. In spite of their violent demonstrations, she defended her dinner, and held them at bay with a
broomstick until the arrival of her son, Ebenezer.

The story is also told of her strength in searching for and finding a new born calf in the woods, after the men
had given up the search, and (Esther) returning triumphant with the calf rolled in her apron.

Esther Grosvenor died in Pomfret in 1738, at the age of 86. She retained her health and vigor to a
remarkable degree, walking to and from Pomfret Meetinghouse, more than a mile, every Sabbath. Her last days
were spent at the old Ralph Sabin homestead at Sabin Corner, and in 1950 was owned by Capt. Hugh Goodhue,
USN, a descendant of the family. This house is one of three built by Ester Grosvenor. Construction was begun in
1696 and finished in 1725, a remarkable example of colonial architecture, the old timbers still there, and the
shutters that were used when the house was built. The outer walls are lined with brick, as protection again Indian
attack. The estate has always been in the Grosvenor and Sabin families.

Another Esther Grosvenor house stood on Pomfret Street, and burned in 1913, while being used as an
Episcopal Rectory. Maps of 1856 show it was owned by Job Williams, Town Clerk from Roxbury, Mass. (Lands
and Church Records, City of Boston, Record Comm. p. 211.

On 2/13/1673, Esther was excommunicated from the church and on 9/2/1673 she reconciled to the church
and solemnly owned the covenant. We do not know why Esther was excommunicated.

Esther was buried on June 15, 1738 in the Wappaquian Burial Grounds, at the foot of Prospect Hill in
Pomfret, CT.


Sabin Cemetery, Pomfret Cemetery records:
Grosvenor:


Abel, s of John & Hannah, d 6 Jan 1780 29 yrs
Abigail, w of John, d 15 Apr 1763 29 yrs
Albethaer, w of Capt. Thomas, d 8 Mar 1789 26 yrs
Amos, d 3 Jan 1799 74 yrs
Amos Jr., s of Amos & Mary, d 26 Oct 1776 18 yrs
Ann, w of Ebenezer, d 30 Jun 1743 55 yrs
Caleb, s of Caleb & Sarah, d 31 Mar 1751 4 yrs 5 mos 16 das
Caleb sr., d 20 Apr 1788 71 yrs
Charles, s of Oliver & Zerinah, d 25 Sept 1773 4 mos
Ebenezer, d 20 Sept 1730 46 yrs
Elizabeth, dau of Thomas & Elizabeth, d 22 Jul 1726 6 yrs
Elizabeth, w of Thomas, d 27 Dec 1770 76 yrs
Esther, w of John, d 15 Jun 1738 87 yrs
Hannah, w of John, d 1 Aug 1783 70 yrs
Infant ch of Thomas & Albethaer
Jerusha, dau of Leicester, d 4 May 1730 25 yrs
Jerusha, dau of Amos & Mary, d 17 Sept 1765 3 yrs
John Trobridge, s of Benjamin H. & Chloe, d 15 Jan 1797 1 yr
John, b 22 May 1711, d 3 Feb 1804
Joseph, s of Caleb & Sarah, d 25 Oct 1784 28 yrs
Joseph, d 20 Jun 1738 48 yrs
Joshua, d 9 May 1724 23 yrs
Leicester, d 8 Sept 1759 82 yrs
Mary, w of Leicester, d 14 May 1724 37 yrs
Mary, w of Amos, d 5 Apr 1770 42 yrs
Moses, d 8 Feb 1773 4 yrs
Nathan, s of John & Hannah, d 20 Jun 1738 3 yrs
Nathan, s of John & Hannah, d 3 Jul 1764 24 yrs
Pearly, s of Amos & Mary, d 15 Mar 1787 21 yrs
Pearley, s of Thomas & Albethaer, d 19 Aug 1791 4 yrs
Phebe, dau of Amos & Mary, d 11 Sept 1769 7 yrs
Priscille, au of Caleb & Sarah, d 25 Oct 1784 28 yrs
Prudence, dau of John & Hannah, d 22 Sept 1743 2 yrs
Rebeckah, w of Leicester, d 21 May 1753 60 yrs
Roswell, s of Capt. Seth & Abigail, d 12 May 1774 2 yrs
Sarah, dau of Caleb, d 11 Feb 1793 71 yrs
Thomas, d 6 Feb 1799 42 yrs (RW)
William, d 23 Jul 1781 59 yrs (RW)


Frederic W. Bailey, Early Connecticut Marriages as Found on Ancient Church Records prior to 1800. New Haven, CT: 1896-1906.Marriage records:
Amos Grosvenor & Mary Hutchings, May 1, 1755
Moses Grosvenor & Dorcas Sharp, Jan. 10, 1765
Alexander Sessions & Sarah Grosvenor, Feb. 29, 1774
Amasa Sessions & Esther Grosvenor, Dec. 14, 1775
William Chandler of Woodstock & Mary Grosvenor, Feb. 6, 1777
Joshua Grosvenor & Sarah Ingals, Feb. 10, 1784
Thomas Grosvenor, 2d, & Alathea Grosvenor, June 3, 1784
Chester Grosvenor & Polly Lyon, Dec. 16, 1784
Ward Cotton & Nabby Grosvenor, Jan. 31, 1792
Elisha Williams of Spencertown & Lucia Grosvenor, Feb. 5, 1795
Eli Hartshorn of Franklin & Elizabeth Grosvenor, June 10, 1795
Ithiel Cargill & Lucy Grosvenor, April 28, 1796
Amasa Storrs of Mansfield & Gratis Grosvenor, Jan. 10, 1797
POMFRET MARRIAGE RECORDS

One of two surviving sons of John Grosvenor, who had been one of the six original large landowners in this corner of Windham County, Connecticut. Leicester was chosen as one of the first selectmen when Pomfret became a town in 1714, and he was elected to that office for one-year terms 19 times. He also rose to the elected rank of Captain in the local militia and held numerous other local offices of responsibility. Dr. Dayton believes that Leicester's homestead was upon the hill that rises beyond the tiny Pomfret village center (with the meetinghouse), at a distance of a "vigorous walk from the church," as the town's historian puts it.

# Note: I. Probably born at Bridgnorth, Shropshire, England., in 1640; died at ROXBURY, Massachusetts, Sept. 27, 1691. He was one of the original purchasers (from Capt. James Fitch for 30 pounds) of the Mashamoquet tract of land (15,100 acres) , in northeastern Connecticut. Johns share of 502 acres comprised the site of the present village of Pomfret together with Prospect Hill, Sharp's Hill, and Spaulding's Hill. His home in Roxbury with four acres of orchard and pasture stood in the N.E. corner of the present Tremont and Parker Streets. He died before settlement at Pomfret began; but his widow and children settled there. He married, about 1672, Ester Clarke, daughter of Hugh and Elizabeth Clarke of Roxbury. She was born, probably at Watertown, Massachusetts, about 1651; died at Pomfret, June 15, 1738. children: - William (1673 - ); John (1675-1710); Leicester (1677-1759); Susanna (1681- ); a still-born child (1683); Ebenezer (1684-1730);Thomas (1687-1730); Joseph (1689-1738). From the notes of Horace Chipman Grosvenor, my grandfather, and Oliver Gay Grosvenor, around 1930's or 1940's. FAMILY BIBLE OF LEMUEL GROSVENOR OWNED BY GRANDDAUGHTER CLARISSA THOMPSON OF POMFRET CT. STATES JOHN AND ESTHER HIS WIFE CAME TO ROXBURY MA. IN 1680, BUT RECORDS SHOW HE WAS HERE AS EARLY AS 1673. QUERY: WAS JOHN THE SON OF THE 19th GROSVENOR, THE 1st BARONET AND NIGHT OR OF 20 THE SECOND BARONET? His name probably was spelled Gravener. The family in England flourished in the parish of Claverley derived its name from the hamlet of Gravenor, appearing in the earliest records as "de Gravenor." JOHN GROSVENOR OF ROXBURY, Massachusetts, HIS FAMILY AND ANCESTRY states "In April, 1918, The New England Historical and Genealogical Register published an article entitled "The English Home and Ancestry of John Grosvenor of Roxbury, Massachusetts," in which the writer, Mr. Daniel Kent, effectually dispelled some of the myths in which romanticized tradition had previously enshrouded this subject. A brief account of the man and his immediate family will be given- - - "Of John Grosvenor himself, little is known. He was in Roxbury as early as 1672; but how long he had been there, we are not told. By occupation, he was a tanner. He held the office of town constable. According to his gravestone, he died Sept. 27, 1691, in his 49th year. He seems to have been prosperous, for his widow, as administratrix of his estate, furnished a bond of 700 pounds. On March 13, 1672 he witnessed a land sale from John Riggs to Samuel Durkin, Suffolk deed IX: 140. In May, 1686, with five other men, (Samuel Ruggles Sr., Samuel Ruggles Jr., John White, Samuel Gore), he purchased from Capt. James Fitch of Norwich, Connecticut, the Mashamoquet tract of land, comprising 15,100 acres in the northeastern corner of Connecticut (which included the territory of the present towns of Pomfret, Brooklyn, and Putnam and the parish of Abington, Connecticut). The price was 30 pounds. The deed stipulated that they should immediately take in six more partners and that 2 shares should be reserved for Capt. Fitch himself, making a total of 14 shares. The disturbed conditions which attended the regime of Gov. Andros delayed the enterprise, so that no division of the tract into separate holdings was made until March, 1694. John Grosvenor being dead, his share was allotted to his widow (502 acres and comprised the land where the village of Pomfret now stands and the hills which surround it, including Prospect Hill, which faces the east, and the commanding eminences called Sharp's Hill and Spaulding's Hill on the west.). Perhaps the fact that three of her children were under 10 years of age at the time made it seem unwise to expose them to the hardships of a life in the wilderness. However that may be, in the fall of 1695, Mrs. Grosvenor sold her property in Ro


1225. Esther Clarke

*Esther Clarke Grosvenor

According to "Folklore and Firesides of Pomfret, Hampton and Vicinity" by Susan Jewett Griggs, pp. 7, 8,
30-31, "In the division of plots Mrs. Esther Grosvenor chose some of the finest land on Pomfret Hill, Ct., and a
tract of land in the Ragged Hill section on Post Road.

Mrs. Grosvenor was endowed with great courage and energy, and although she had been gently reared in
England, like a true pioneer endured the hard life cheerfully. Skilled in the care of the sick, for many years she was
the only medical practitioner.

Once, when alone, her home was invaded by a company of Indians, who threatened to take a boiling pot of
meat from the fire. In spite of their violent demonstrations, she defended her dinner, and held them at bay with a
broomstick until the arrival of her son, Ebenezer.

The story is also told of her strength in searching for and finding a new born calf in the woods, after the men
had given up the search, and (Esther) returning triumphant with the calf rolled in her apron.

Esther Grosvenor died in Pomfret in 1738, at the age of 86. She retained her health and vigor to a
remarkable degree, walking to and from Pomfret Meetinghouse, more than a mile, every Sabbath. Her last days
were spent at the old Ralph Sabin homestead at Sabin Corner, and in 1950 was owned by Capt. Hugh Goodhue,
USN, a descendant of the family. This house is one of three built by Ester Grosvenor. Construction was begun in
1696 and finished in 1725, a remarkable example of colonial architecture, the old timbers still there, and the
shutters that were used when the house was built. The outer walls are lined with brick, as protection again Indian
attack. The estate has always been in the Grosvenor and Sabin families.

Another Esther Grosvenor house stood on Pomfret Street, and burned in 1913, while being used as an
Episcopal Rectory. Maps of 1856 show it was owned by Job Williams, Town Clerk from Roxbury, Mass. (Lands
and Church Records, City of Boston, Record Comm. p. 211.

On 2/13/1673, Esther was excommunicated from the church and on 9/2/1673 she reconciled to the church
and solemnly owned the covenant. We do not know why Esther was excommunicated.

Esther was buried on June 15, 1738 in the Wappaquian Burial Grounds, at the foot of Prospect Hill in
Pomfret, CT.


1226. Daniel Waldo

8 children


1227. Susanna Adams

old burying ground near Wappaquias Brook

Susannah Adams (14) was born about 1660 or 1661 in Chelmsford, MA, died 16 March 1740/41 in Pomfret, CT, and was buried in Old Burial Grounds, Wappaquiane Brook, CT. She married Daniel Waldo, son of Cornelius Waldo and Hannah Cogswell, on 20 Nov. 1683 in Ipswich or Chelmsford, MA. He was born 19 Aug. 1657 in Ipswich or Chelmsford, MA, and died 1 Nov. 1737 in Pomfret, CT.

According to one source (R‑16), all their children, with the possible exception of Zachariah, were born in Dunstable, MA. However, according to another source (R‑15), the first 2 children were born in Dunstable, the next 5 in Chelmsford, MA, the 8th in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., MA, and the last, Sarah, was not mentioned. (R‑15, R‑16)

Children - Waldo

+46. Susannah Waldo, b. 1684, m. Richard Field, 17 Jan. 1704.

+47. Hannah Waldo, b. 17 July 1687, m. Ephraim Cary, 3 Feb. 1709, d. 18 Oct. 1777.

+48. Bethiah Waldo, b. 20 Aug. 1688, m(1) Edmund Littlefield, 6 Dec. 1711, m(2) Thomas Haywood, 1719.

49. Daniel Waldo, b. 25 March 1692, d. 25 Jan. 1715/16 (Pomfret, CT).

50. Rebecca (or Rebekah) Waldo, b. 5 Feb. 1692/93 (or 1693/94), m. (Capt.) Leicester Grosvenor, 12 Feb. 1727/28 (Pomfret, CT), d. 21 May 1753 (Pomfret, CT).

51. Marah Waldo, b. 10 Feb. 1694/95 (or 1695/96), m. Abiel Cheney, 3 May 1720 (Pomfret, CT), d. 2 Dec. 1787 (Pomfret, CT).

52. Esther Waldo, b. 3 Jan. 1697/98, m. John Weld, c. 1727 (Pomfret, CT), d. 11 Jan. 1777 (Pomfret, CT).

53. Zachariah (or Zechariah) Waldo, b. 25 Nov. 1701, m. Abigail Griffen, 25 June 1728 (Pomfret, CT), d. 22 Nov. 1761 (Pomfret, CT).

54. Sarah Waldo, b.c. 1702, m. John Hyde, 19 May 1720 (Boston, MA).


1228. Edmund Thomas Weld

8747. Elizabeth White. Born ca 1667 at Roxbury, MA. Baptized on 22 Mar 1667/8 at Roxbury, MA CR1.46 Elizabeth died at Roxbury, MA, on 20 Dec 1721.46 Elizabeth died of smallpox.

On 10 Nov 1687 Elizabeth married Edmund Weld (20847) , son of Thomas Weld (8700) (ca Jul 1626-17 Jan 1682/3) & Dorothy Whiting (8777) (ca 1628-31 Jul 1694), at Roxbury, MA.46 Born on 29 Sep 1659 at Roxbury, MA.46 Baptized on 2 Oct 1659. Edmund died at Roxbury, MA, in Jul 1748.117 Occupation: Cooper.

Edmund took the oath of allegiance in Roxbury in 1678 or 1679, and held a pew in the meeting house of the First Church in 1693. He held a house in Roxbury, one half of which he deeded 15 Feb 1723/4 to his son Edmund Weld, joyner, as also one half right in the Training Field of Roxbury which was destined to be the subject of later controversy. He provided in this deed that Edmund, if he survived him, should have the right to buy the other half of the house at it appraisal value, upon condition that if he should marry again, and his wife should survive him and remain his widow, his half should remain to her during her widowhood. His wife's property was of sufficient importance for him to be appointed by Judge Samuel Sewall administrator for her personbal estate, teh wri of adminstration specifically excepting her real estate.1


1236. Rev Preserved Smith

graduated from Brown University and settled in the ministry in Rowe Mass.


1248. (Andrew)?Robert Langworthy

Four men are assumed to be the sons of Andrew and Rachel (Hubbard) Langworthy, and Andrew is clearly the most controversial of them. * There's little hard evidence that he's one of their children. This is discussed in "The children of Andrew and Rachel", accessed from their family page. * William Franklin Langworthy (WFL) claimed that this man's name was Robert. This is discussed at "Where's Robert?", also accessed from the family page of Andrew and Rachel. Here's what we know or presume about Andrew: * He was probably born between 1670 and 1680, based on the ages of his children. * He married Patience Brownell, daughter of Robert Brownell of Little Compton. * His children included Thomas (born in 1708) and Joseph (born in 1710). WFL said that other children were Robert (the oldest) and Mary (the youngest) who both died before marrying. I've found no evidence to support WFL's statements, and no reason to reject them. * In a deed dated December 26, 1717, Andrew Langworthy says he is a husbandman, i.e. a farmer, of Little Compton. * Andrew died before September 1722, when his widow, Patience, married John Sanford, a widower of Little Compton.


1249. Mary ?(Patience?) Brownell

died of same fever that took daughter Mary life

After Andrew Langworthy died, Patience married John Sanford, of Little Compton. On March 27, 1723, John bought 150 acres of land in Stonington, Connecticut, and it seems that the family (including the Langworthy children) moved to Stonington shortly thereafter. Patience died between May 2, 1726, when she signed a deed with her husband John Sanford, and Aug 20,, 1728, when her sons Thomas and Joseph were heirs of Robert Brownell in right of their mother.


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